Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Robert D Corran 2289, 421911, 240630

Robert Dawson Corran

Identification

The CWGC database had only one R D Corran and research showed that he was from Liverpool.

Family information

Born in Liverpool in 1894 to parents Robert Corran and Helen Corran (formerly Dawson) he was baptised on 4th Dec that year in Holy Trinity Church, Toxteth Park. The family address on the baptism record was 74 Upper Hill Street and Robert Senior's occupation was stevedore.
(A stevedore is a dock worker who loads and unloads ships)

The 1901 census shows the family were living at 5 Great George Street. Robert was still a stevedore and his wife (listed as Ellen) was a 'sweet confectioner dealer' They had three sons (our soldier being the eldest at 6) and one servant.
  
The 1911 census shows that Robert Senior had taken over his wife's job, he was listed here as a 'retail confectioner shopkeeper' and Louie Corran a 'relative' and assistant shopkeeper was living with them. They had moved to 119 Great George St and stated that they worked at home so probably were living over their shop.

At this time Robert Dawson Corran was 16 and working as a clerk for a barrister. He had another two younger siblings and the census shows that the Corran’s had not lost any of their 6 children.

At the time of his death, Robert Corran was engaged to Edie Rutherglen.

Military Information

Robert D Corran's medal roll entry shows that he served as a private in the Liverpool Regiment with the number 2289 then in the Liverpool Regiment as acting corporal with the number 240630 and also as an acting corporal with the Royal Engineers number 431911.

He received the1915 star as a private with the Kings Liverpool Regiment as he first entered the theatre of war (Western Europe) with this regiment on 25th February 1915. It also records that he died of wounds 19th Sept 1918.

Death and Commemoration

 Information from UK Soldiers died in the Great War:

Name:
Robert Dawson Corran
Death Date:
14 Sep 1918
Death Location:
France & Flanders
Enlistment Location:
Liverpool
Rank:
A/2/Corporal
Regiment:
Corps of Royal Engineers
Number:
431911
Type of Casualty:
Died of wounds
Theatre of War:
Western European Theatre
Comments:
Formerly 246630, Liverpool Regt. (3rd Field Sur. Coy., R.E.)




Robert Dawson Corran was buried in grave I.A.3 of Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manacourt. His headstone records that he was a 2nd Corporal.


There are a few minor discrepancies about his rank and date of death between records. We can be certain that they all pertain to the same soldier as the regimental numbers all match. The discrepancies are small and can be explained by the difficult job of recording the field promotions, dates of injury and dates of death for so many men in this late stage of the war.

His family and Fiancée placed the following notices in the Liverpool newspapers:

25th and 26th September 1918
KILLED IN ACTIONCORRAN – September 14, killed in action, aged 24 years, ROBERT DAWSON (Bob) Corpl, R.E. eldest and dearly-beloved son of Robert and Helen Corran. 13 Howard-drive, Grassendale.Mourn not for him, nor lay your heart within that lonely grave,Think you those narrow bounds could hold that spirit pure and brave?Earth’s uniform, discarded now, beneath the sod is laid;He had his marching orders – as a soldier, he obeyed. CORRAN – In loving memory of my dear BOB, who was killed in action September 14. (Lonely am I today, for the one I loved so dearly has for ever passed away.) – from his sorrowing Fiancée Edie Rutherglen, Grassendale Park.


You can find out more about Field Survey Companies here on The Long, Long Trail website. 





2 comments:

Stephen Harding said...

Corran or Corrin is a Manx name and you can be sure that with a name like Robert Corran his origins are on the Island like the Corkish named before him on the memorial.

There are families of Corrams on the Island and Robert Corram is a well known name.

I trust this will assist. I have researched my own families 1WW history and have made some moving discoveries.

Regards,

Stephen M Harding

Amanda said...

Thank you Stephen, every avenue for research is appreciated.